Low-Dose Aspirin’s Influence on Diabetes Patients

In general, the majority of research dedicated to the impact of low-dose aspirin on the prevention of cardiovascular events in patients with diabetes implies a systematic review of clinical trials. In other words, scholars make the analysis of the randomized trials’ results. The study of Saito, et al. (2017) differ from traditional researches dedicated to the impact of medications on patients’ health condition to some extent as it implies the analysis of only one specifically designed and conducted trial. Nevertheless, the findings of this multicenter, randomized, open-label, blinded end-point and standard care-controlled trial may be regarded as relevant and valid as it involved a substantial number of participants and collected data over the last ten years (Saito, et al., 2017). Taking into consideration the method of the research, it is possible to conclude that it may be defined as quantitative.

It is not difficult to find a quantitative article dedicated to the health issue described in the PICOT question. A prevalent number of studies related to this specialty imply the general analysis of patients’ results. Population, the participants’ quantity, the absence of their direct involvement, and the study’s duration determine the investigation’s approach and the research’s validity. In general, the quantitative design is highly suitable for the investigation of the medication’s impact on the population as a substantial number of participants are traditionally allowed to make relevant conclusions. At the same time, scholars may be substantively limited in the replication of similar researches. On the one hand, a group of scientists may analyze the results of previous surveys, however, the organization and conduct of a large trial, as described by Saito, et al. (2017), require substantial resources, time, and participants.

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As a matter of fact, the results of the research conducted by Saito, et al. (2017) demonstrate that the advantages of low-dose aspirin for the primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases in female and male patients with diabetes are highly controversial. Despite its potential reduction of cardiovascular events, this medication increases the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding and hemorrhagic stroke (Saito, et al., 2017). These findings are supported by another research conducted by Huang, et al. (2019). According to it, “the benefits of low-dose aspirin for secondary prevention of myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke are well established, with the prevention of recurrent ischemic events outweighing the risk of hemorrhage” (Huang, et al., 2019, p. 907). However, the analysis of thirteen clinical trials demonstrated the risk of intracranial bleeding, intracranial hemorrhage, subdural or extradural hemorrhage, intracerebral hemorrhage, or subarachnoid hemorrhage related to the use of aspirin for primary prevention (Huang, et al., 2019).

The same results may be observed in the article of Lin, et al. (2019). The collection of randomized controlled trials revealed the benefits of low-dose aspirin for senior patients with diabetes in the prevention of stroke (Lin, et al., 2019). At the same time, the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding, intracranial hemorrhage, non-fatal myocardial infarction substantially increases (Lin, et al., 2019). In general, the impact of aspirin for the primary prevention of cardiovascular events in women with diabetes is observed. However, for the answer on the PICOT question, the examination of the low-dose aspirin’s influence on patients with diabetes within the framework of the secondary prevention may be required.

References

Huang, W., Saver, J. L., Wu, Y., Lin, C., Lee, M., & Ovbiagele, B. (2019). Frequency of intracranial hemorrhage with low-dose aspirin in individuals without symptomatic cardiovascular disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis. JAMA Neurology, 76(8), 906-914. Web.

Lin, M., Lee, C., Lin, C., Zou, Y., Lu. C., Hsieh, C., & Lee, C. (2019). Low-dose aspirin for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in diabetic individuals: A meta-analysis of randomized control trials and trial sequential analysis. Journal of Clinical Medicine, 8(5), 1-13. Web.

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Saito, Y., Okada, S., Ogawa, H., Soejima, H., Sakuma, M., Nakayama, M., Doi, N., Jinnouchi, H., Waki, M., Masuda, I., & Morimoto, T. (2017). Low-dose aspirin for primary prevention of cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: 10-Year follow-up of a randomized controlled trial. Circulation, 135(7), 659-670. Web.

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