Parent as the First Educator on Sex to Child

Proposal

This proposal aims at presenting the importance of the first sex education provided by a parent. Nowadays the liberalization of sexual morality along with sexual ignorance entails serious consequences such as unwanted pregnancies and abortions, sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), and infection of immune deficiency virus (HIV). Modern society is often called a risk society. Hence, it shows an increased concern for both public and personal security.

In the framework of the chosen topic, this means safe and responsible sex. In order not to force children to assimilate this knowledge experimentally or another way, society is to create a set of special educational programs. The development of appropriate programs is initiated by such authoritative international organizations as the World Health Organization (WHO), the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF), and the World Association for Sexual Health (WAS).

It becomes clear from the above observations that the topic is rather significant to study to ensure the child’s knowledge about safe sex. At that, a parent plays an integral part in sex education is one of the most important teachers in the child’s life. The relevance of the topic is caused by an increased number of early pregnancies and STDs among adolescents. Thus, in an attempt to secure the child and his or her future, parents need to know how to talk with their children about sex meeting their curiosity related to a human body (Chirban & Andrews, 2012). Family values need to be implemented in the child’s sex education serving as a powerful means to establish close relationships and trust that, in turn, would promote adequate perception and understanding of the issue by the child.

Sex education is of great importance for the further development of the child. The perception of the future marital status, attitude toward marriage, the opposite sex, and behavior in sexual relations is likely to depend on sex education. There is an opinion that it is experts who should be first in teaching child sex education. Being the specialists, the educators certainly have more knowledge and skills concerning the topic. They also have more experience and know specific methods of education.

Unfortunately, not all teaching and training institutions provide complete information or at least general information on the subject. It can cause misunderstanding and mistrust leading to inadequate sexual behavior. However, in the case of sex education is provided in the context of open communication and a trustful atmosphere, it is also can ensure a strong basis for the further sexual development of the child.

In this regard, the following research questions are to be answered in the course of the study:

  • RQ 1. What is the parent’s role in teaching sex education to the child?
  • RQ 2. What is the importance of the first sex education provided by the parent?
  • RQ 3. What are the alternatives? Are they appropriate?
  • RQ 4. Are there any complications and gaps in such education?
  • RQ 5. Is it ideal for the parent to be the first educator on sex to the child?

The listed research questions would help to reveal core definitions and key aspects of the problem and to come up with relevant and evidence-based conclusions. It is expected that the research would reflect the integral nature of the first sex education provided by the parent. However, it is also reasonable to suggest that sex education is teamwork that should be performed by both the expert educators and parents.

Literature Review: Theoretical Review

Parents are the first educators of the child, and, therefore, the responsibility for the sex education of children falls primarily on them. However, the psychology of the child is designed so that it is easier for them emotionally to get information about the sexual side of life from their peers or the Internet (Chirban & Andrews, 2012). In this case, the parents do not feel confident when it comes to conversations about intimate matters. As a result, the majority of parents express the desire to get professional help to talk with their children (Pop & Rusu, 2015). This lack of preparation leads to the absence or inappropriateness of sex education in the family. According to Yukiko and Mariko (2010), such information is so intimate that it can create intense emotional discomfort in both parents and the child.

The relationships between the parents and the child would manifest themselves in the future behavior of the letter (Pop & Rusu, 2015). An example of parents in all matters ranging from how they communicate with each other and with the child and ending with values and beliefs shared is of paramount importance for the appropriate development of the child (Pop & Rusu, 2015). Talking specifically of the sex education, the timely and adequate provision of the necessary information to the child would help them to avoid a variety of difficulties, problems, and sometimes even tragedies (Chirban & Andrews, 2012).

The child needs to understand that along with the positive aspect, sex always entails certain consequences and risks including the risk of unwanted early pregnancies, the risk of contracting dangerous diseases, the risk of rape, the risk of trauma, and sometimes the risk of obtaining wrong authority.

References

Chirban, J. T., & Andrews, A. (2012). How to talk with your kids about sex. Nashville, TN: Thomas Nelson.

Pop, M. V., & Rusu, A. S. (2015). The role of parents in shaping and improving the sexual health of children. Procedia – Social and Behavioral Sciences, 209(2), 395-401.

Yukiko, O., & Mariko, K. (2010). The role of parents in sex education at home. Journal of Japan Academy of Midwifery, 24(2), 333-338.