The Human Papillomavirus Vaccine for Girls

The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine was discovered after many years of research. It protects against genital warts and various forms of cancer, including anal, cervical, oropharynx, and vulvar cancers. I believe the vaccine should be compulsory for girls of certain ages. The HPV vaccine is revolutionary and reduces the likelihood of girls developing many types of fatal cancer. For instance, cervical cancer ranks fifth in the causes of death for women worldwide (Intlekofer et al., 2012). Widespread adoption of the vaccine will help reduce this mortality rate. Additionally, the main reason cited by parents for refusing to have their female children vaccinated is vaccine safety. However, international studies have proved that the vaccine is nearly 100% safe and effective (“The HPV vaccine: Why parents choose to refuse”, 2018). There are no tangible reasons why parents should refuse to have their children vaccinated. Teenage girls should be required to be vaccinated against the human papillomavirus.

I also think it should be mandatory for insurance to cover boys. Most people believe that only girls are supposed to receive the HPV vaccine to prevent cervical cancer. However, the vaccine also helps to prevent other conditions that affect boys, such as penile cancer and genital warts. From a financial standpoint, insurance should cover HPV vaccines for boys to prevent the development of genital warts, which is more costly to treat in males (Intlekofer et al., 2012). In addition, vaccinating males can also reduce transmission to their female counterparts (Intlekofer et al., 2012). The main reason why parents do not consent to HPV vaccination for their male children is lack of necessity (“The HPV vaccine: Why parents choose to refuse”, 2018). One way for parents to understand the necessity of vaccinating boys against HPV is by educating them. Another way is by insurance companies being required to cover boys. Insurance companies should cover HPV vaccines for both sexes to increase the uptake of the vaccine, especially among boys who lag in vaccination.

We'll create an entirely exclusive & plagiarism-free paper for $13.00 $11.05/page 569 certified experts on site View More

References

Intlekofer, K. A., Cunningham, M. J., & Caplan, A. L. (2012). The HPV vaccine controversy. AMA Journal of Ethics, 14(1), 39-49. Web.

The HPV vaccine: Why parents really choose to refuse. (2018). John Hopkins Medicine. Web.

Cite this paper

Select a referencing style

Reference

AssignZen. (2022, October 15). The Human Papillomavirus Vaccine for Girls. Retrieved from https://assignzen.com/the-human-papillomavirus-vaccine-for-girls/

Work Cited

"The Human Papillomavirus Vaccine for Girls." AssignZen, 15 Oct. 2022, assignzen.com/the-human-papillomavirus-vaccine-for-girls/.

1. AssignZen. "The Human Papillomavirus Vaccine for Girls." October 15, 2022. https://assignzen.com/the-human-papillomavirus-vaccine-for-girls/.


Bibliography


AssignZen. "The Human Papillomavirus Vaccine for Girls." October 15, 2022. https://assignzen.com/the-human-papillomavirus-vaccine-for-girls/.

References

AssignZen. 2022. "The Human Papillomavirus Vaccine for Girls." October 15, 2022. https://assignzen.com/the-human-papillomavirus-vaccine-for-girls/.

References

AssignZen. (2022) 'The Human Papillomavirus Vaccine for Girls'. 15 October.

Click to copy

This report on The Human Papillomavirus Vaccine for Girls was written and submitted by your fellow student. You are free to use it for research and reference purposes in order to write your own paper; however, you must cite it accordingly.

Removal Request

If you are the original creator of this paper and no longer wish to have it published on Asignzen, request the removal.